Joel Purra: Developer and more


Gitslave Home Page: <http://gitslave.sf.net>

NAME gits - The git slave repository tool for multi-repository management

SYNOPSIS gits [-p|–parallel COUNT] [-v|–verbose]+ [–quiet] [–help] [–long-help] [–version] [-n|–no-pager] [–paginate] [–eval-args] [–exclude SLAVE-REGEXP] [–no-master] [–keep-going] [–no-commit] [–no-hide] [–no-progress] [–with-ifpresent|–just-ifpresent] SUBCOMMAND [ARGS]…

Special subcommands include: prepare, autoattach, attach, populate,
release, detach, pulls, logs, exec, resolve, update-remote-url,
statuses, archive, enable, version.

See --long-help for full details.

OVERVIEW gits is a program that assists in assembling a meta-project from a number of individual git repositories which operate (when using gits) as if they were one git repository instead of many, similar to the way that CVS works by default and svn (v1.5) can be coerced to work. Some of these individual git repositories may be part of other meta-projects as well.

Unfortunately, the functionality provided by git-submodule is not
sufficient for this mode of operation. Most git commands, like checkout
or commit, do not recursively descend into the submodules so you are
forced to do execute all git commands N+1 times (leading to pain and
mistakes), also, submodules revisions are tracked in the supermodule so
that changes to a submodule made outside the supermodule are not
automatically seen. Since git does not allow partial checkouts, we are
left with little alternative.

Thus, to solve these problems gits was born. Complexity pain is still
involved, but the hope is that it is minimized compared to all of the
other alternatives.

The basic theory is that there are a few sub-commands (prepare,
autoattach, attach, populate) which help set up the meta-project for
gits operations. Then, except for git commands with specific filenames,
like git add FILENAME; git reset FILENAME; etc., you should use "gits"
instead of "git", and the command will run on all repositories in the
project.

Example Usage In the following example, we will have the following master repositories:

  ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/super.git
  ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/lib1.git
  ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/lib2.git

The desired working layout of directories with .git in them on disk is:

  ..../super
  ..../super/lib1
  ..../super/lib2

Clone a gits project gits clone [–[no-]fromcheckout] [–nohooks] [–reference[checkout]=PATH] SUPERPROJECT-URL

This command clones an existing superproject and all associated slave
repositories. It runs `git clone` on the arguments you provide (allowing
you to change the name of the checked-out repository for example) and
then runs `gits populate` inside that newly checked out repository. If
you are cloning from an existing gitslave checkout instead of the master
layout (the master layout is specified in the gits attach commands), you
would want to use the --fromcheckout argument.

By default, if there is a git-hooks directory present in the
superproject, hooks there will be symlinked into the .git/hooks
directory in all related repositories. Adding --nohooks will disable
this management.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/super.git super2
  cd super2
  --------------------------------------------------

The gits option --with-ifpresent can be used with this command to
populate all conditional slave repositories (those marked with ifpresent
flag).

The clone options --reference=PATH or --referencecheckout=PATH work like
the `git clone --reference` option, modifying the path based on the
normal rules (the --fromcheckout rules are used with
--referencecheckout) for upstream repository construction. You must use
equals (=) to separate the PATH argument from the option, you cannot use
whitespace as allowed by git.

The purpose of the --reference options is to avoid lengthy network
copies if you already have a local repository. Note that the use of
shared repositories created by --reference is potentially dangerous; see
the notes on --shared in the git-clone man page and consider running
`gits repack -a` to remove these linkages.

Initialize a gits project gits prepare [–init]

You run this command in the git directory which will be your top level
master repository (super here). Typically you would clone this top level
master from some other location which has all of your git projects.

  --------------------------------------------------
  git clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/super.git super
  cd super
  gits prepare
  --------------------------------------------------

If you use the optional "--init" argument, `git init` will be executed
to create the git repository.

Automatically set up slaves based on current checkout gits autoattach

You run this command in the git directory which will be your top level
master repository where you have manually performed checkouts or move
operations or whatever was necessary to get the current disk structure
to look like you want. This command will try to compute relative paths
(assuming your URLs are uniform--if you checked out one repository using
a fully qualified domain name and another by a hostname, the current
relative URL generation system will not be able to tell the difference).

  --------------------------------------------------
  git clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/super.git super
  cd super
  git clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/slave1.git
  git clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/slave2.git
  git clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/other/slave3.git
  gits autoattach
  git status
  git diff --cached
  git commit -m "Created gitslave infrastructure"
  --------------------------------------------------

Note that this will not release/detach any slaves which are no longer
present, this is an additive operation only. You may delete the
.gitslave file (and manually strip out the correct lines from
.gitignore) beforehand to simulate a replacement operation.

Add a slave repository to top level master gits attach [–recursive=FILENAME] [–reference=PATH] [–adminonly] REPOSITORY LOCALPATH [FLAGS]

Clone the named git repository into the named local directory, and set
it up for further gits operations.

Typically LOCALPATH would be a path relative to the top level working
directory, for example, a subdirectory in the top level.

REPOSITORY can also be relative (relative to the URL the top level
master checkout was cloned from). It may also be an absolute URL but if
so, `gits remote add` is not going to be happy. If the URL starts with
^, it will use only the method and hostname from the master's URL.
Otherwise, it will be relative to the fully qualified path. We will show
both in operation in the example.

The only [flags] currently supported is "ifpresent" which will be set
for this slave repository. Other people cloning or populating the
superproject will not check out this subrepository if this flag is set,
unless they add --with-ifpresent or otherwise arrange for the LOCALPATH
to be created.

If the --recursive=FILENAME argument is present (and you *must* use the
--recursive=FILENAME style, not "--recursive FILENAME") the repository
you are attaching will be treated as a recursive gitslave master
underneath the top-level gitslave master. The filename will typically be
".gitslave". It is relative to the localpath you checked out and must
not have any / in it.

The attach option --reference=PATH works exactly like the `git clone
--reference` option. In fact this option will be passed as-is to the
`git clone` command. You must use equals (=) to separate the PATH
argument from the option, you cannot use whitespace as allowed by git.

The purpose of the --reference option is to avoid lengthy network copies
if you already have a local repository. Note that the use of shared
repositories created by --reference is potentially dangerous; see the
notes on --shared in the git-clone man page and consider running `gits
repack -a` to remove these linkages.

If the --adminonly option is given, this tells gitslave to set up the
management files and to NOT clone. You must clone through a subsequent
prepare or some manual action.

 --------------------------------------------------
 gits attach ../lib1.git lib1
 gits attach ^/src/repos/lib2.git lib2
 gits attach --recursive=.gitslave ../../super2 supersub
 gits push
 --------------------------------------------------

The push in the example is to share the attach with other users.

Checkout any slave repositories that may have been added gits populate [–[no-]fromcheckout] [–nohooks] [–reference[checkout]=PATH] [SLAVES]…

Go through the list of configured slaves and check out (clone) any which
have not already been retrieved.

With --fromcheckout, assume that the remote repository is a gits
checkout instead of in standard repository layout. With
--no-fromcheckout, assume that the remote repository has the standard
layout. If either option is given, sets the default repository layout,
which is used when no explicit option is provided.

The gits option --with-ifpresent can be used with this command to
populate all conditional slave repositories (those marked with ifpresent
flag). You can also populate particular conditional slave repositories
by listing them on the command line.

By default, if there is a git-hooks directory present in the
superproject, hooks there will be symlinked into the .git/hooks
directory in all related repositories. Adding --nohooks will disable
this management.

The populate options --reference=PATH or --referencecheckout=PATH work
like the `git clone --reference` option, modifying the path based on the
normal rules (the --fromcheckout rules are used with
--referencecheckout) for upstream repository construction. You must use
equals (=) to separate the PATH argument from the option, you cannot use
whitespace as allowed by git.

The purpose of the --reference options is to avoid lengthy network
copies if you already have a local repository. Note that the use of
shared repositories created by --reference is potentially dangerous; see
the notes on --shared in the git-clone man page and consider running
`gits repack -a` to remove these linkages.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits populate
  --------------------------------------------------

Safely delete local repositories that are no longer wanted gits release [-n] –all | –just-ifpresent | SUPERPROJECT | SLAVES…

Go through the list of configured slaves (or slave arguments) and
confirm that there are no unresolved conflicts, untracked (and not
ignored) files, uncommitted changes (including staged or stashed
changes), unpushed commits, or unmerged private branches, and that there
is a tracking branch in each repository. If these conditions are met in
*all* of the selected slaves, the selected slave directories are removed
(rm -rf).

The --no-commit (or -n) option prevents repositories from being removed.
(Note that if -n is passed to 'gits' instead of the 'release'
subcommand, it also disables automatic pagination as --no-pager). This
option is implied if the superproject is the root directory (/) or if
paths to any slave repositories start with dot (.), contain '..' (parent
directory) components, or are absolute (start with /).

The --just-ifpresent option can be used to release only conditional
slave repositories (marked with ifpresent flag). This option cannot be
used with slave repository arguments or --all.

The --all option releases the entire current superproject; unless -n,
--no-commit, or --no-master is used, the current directory is removed,
breaking relative paths until you change directory. Instead, you can
pass one superproject as an argument with an absolute path (starting
with /); this will work from any directory.

Other arguments are treated as the names of slave repositories to
release. Only one recursive superproject can be specified, and only as
an absolute path. Slave arguments cannot start with dot (.) or contain
certain shell metacharacters (semicolon, newline, or quotes). Slave
arguments cannot be combined with --all or --just-ifpresent options.

The --force option can be used to force removal even if the state of
some repositories does not meet the conditions noted above. This is
*EXTREMELY DANGEROUS* and roughly equivalent to rm -rf on the arguments;
for this reason the --force option cannot be combined with --all or a
superproject argument.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits release --just-ifpresent
  gits release lib1
  gits release -n --all
  gits release /path/to/super2
  --------------------------------------------------

Remove a slave repository from top level master gits detach [–force] SLAVE

Do a `gits release` on SLAVE; if this succeeds, besides removing the
slave repository from the local filesystem, also remove the slave from
.gitignore and the .gitslave management file, so that it will not be
used in subsequent gits activities.

The --force option can be used to override the gits release check; if
this is done, the repository will not be removed - only .gitignore and
.gitslave will be affected.

The --no-commit option will only remove the slave from .gitignore and
.gitslave; those changes will not be committed, and the slave repository
will not be removed from the local filesystem.

 --------------------------------------------------
 gits detach lib1
 gits push
 --------------------------------------------------

The push in the example is to share the detach with other users.

Perform a pull operation for all tracked branches gits pulls [pull args]

For each branch being tracked by the superproject, go through the list
of configured slaves, check yourself out to the branch, perform a pull,
then switch back to the branch you were on.

Please see SUBSTITUTION for information on how to replace part of the
command with the slave repository name for each executed command.

In the common case where no repository or refspec is provided as an
argument, pulls will perform a fetch once (in the current branch of each
slave) and then rebase (with --preserve-merges) or merge in each branch.
This reduces redundant network overhead in the common case where all
branches of a repository have the same remote, but if that is not the
case, only the current remote will be fetched. If you want to force the
slower operation of a pull in each branch, pass the -- argument, e.g.
gits pulls --rebase --

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits pulls --rebase
  --------------------------------------------------

Perform a pull operation for the current branch only gits pull [pull args]

Go through the list of configured slaves and perform a pull, Note that
even though only the current branch HEAD will be advanced, the commits
on other branches will still be fetched.

Please see SUBSTITUTION for information on how to replace part of the
command with the slave repository name for each executed command.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits pull --rebase
  --------------------------------------------------
  gits pull otherhost:/src/work/wb/%%dir%%
  --------------------------------------------------

Show unified commit logs in a fixed output format gits logs [log args]

For each branch being tracked by the superproject, generate a list of
the "log" messages as specified by the log args, and output them in a
fixed format, with related commits grouped together and ordered by time.
Do *not* provide git log options that modify the output format, as they
will break the ordering and grouping functionality; only arguments that
control the selection of commits should be used. (Note that using the
--date={relative,local,default,iso,rfc,short} option is okay, and will
modify the displayed date format).

The related commit grouping will group together all commits (in any
sub-project) within an 8-hour period that have the same author e-mail
and commit message.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits logs HEAD...Product-3.1.1
  --------------------------------------------------

Perform an arbitrary command for all tracked branches gits exec COMMAND [ARGS]

For each slave being tracked by the superproject and the superproject
itself, cd to the slave directory and execute the listed command.

Please see SUBSTITUTION for information on how to replace part of the
command with the slave repository name for each executed command.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits exec gitk
  --------------------------------------------------
  gits exec git diff
  --------------------------------------------------

Print out URLs for arbitrary repositories like those used by attach gits resolve [–[no-]fromcheckout] REPOSITORY LOCAL_RELPATH [REMOTE]

Go through the same process that gits uses for resolving relative
repository URLs into absolute URLs, for debugging and certain porting
efforts. You may specify the remote of the superproject you wish the
relative repository to be in relation to: by default it uses origin.

With --fromcheckout, resolve URLs as if the repository were a clone of
another gits checkout. With --no-fromcheckout, resolve URLs as if it
were not a clone of another gits checkout. By default it uses the saved
repository layout from gits populate or update-remote-url; however gits
resolve does not change the saved default even if --fromcheckout or
--no-fromcheckout is given.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits resolve ../otherpos otherpos
  gits resolve ../otherpos otherpos otherremote
  --------------------------------------------------

Update the URL a remote repository points at gits update-remote-url [–[no-]fromcheckout] REMOTENAME NEWURL

Update the superproject's remote.REMOTENAME.url to be NEWURL. Then go
though each slave repository and update its remote.REMOTENAME.url using
the normal relative url mechanism.

The --fromcheckout option supports using a gits checkout as the remote
repository, adjusting the repository paths from their default. The
--no-fromcheckout option assumes a normal (as specified in the gits
attach commands) repository layout for the remote. If neither option is
given, the saved repository layout from the most recent gits populate or
update-remote-url command is used; however, this is not generally
correct, as the repository layout of the new remote need not be the same
as the old one. If either --fromcheckout or --no-fromcheckout is given,
sets the default repository layout accordingly.

You can use this command after a clone of a local repository (or local
gits checkout, using gits populate --fromcheckout) so that the new
repository uses the same remote origin as the first one. (The local
clone/populate is much faster than performing a remote clone/populate.)

  --------------------------------------------------
  git clone /home/user/work/wb /home/user/work/newwb
  cd /home/user/work/newwb
  gits populate --fromcheckout
  gits update-remote-url --no-fromcheckout origin ssh://git/src/git/wb
  --------------------------------------------------

Add a new remote to all repositories gits remote add [–[no-]fromcheckout] GIT-REMOTE-ADD-OPTS REMOTENAME REMOTEURL

Adds a remote named REMOTENAME for the repository at REMOTEURL (as
modified by the relative URL rules from `gits attach` and `gits
update-remote-url` and the --fromcheckout argument). The command gits
fetch REMOTENAME can then be used to create and update remote-tracking
branches matching REMOTENAME/*.

The superproject remote URL will be set to REMOTEURL, which should be an
absolute URL; the slave repositories will have a modified version of
that URL (the layout must match that of the existing remotes).

Please note that we do not currently support `gits remote set-url` in a
useful way. See `gits update-remote-url` for an alternate method which
will satisfy most use cases.

 --------------------------------------------------
 gits remote add fred --fromcheckout /home/fred/src/foo
 --------------------------------------------------
 gits remote add backup ssh://backups/src/git/foo
 --------------------------------------------------

Push a change to a remote repository gits push [–quick] [push args]

This is the standard git push command--with the addition of a --quick
option which will only attempt to push for branches which have
outstanding changes. For slow connections to large number of slave
repositories, the overhead of an empty push can be large.

However, --quick only checks to see if the *current* branch needs to
push data. If you have changes on other branches, a slow push is still
required, as it is if you are pushing to a repository other than the
standard origin.

Please see SUBSTITUTION for information on how to replace part of the
command with the slave repository name for each executed command.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits push --quick
  --------------------------------------------------
  gits push otherhost:/src/work/wb/%%dir%%
  --------------------------------------------------

Get status on all branches gits statuses [-m] [status args]

For each branch being tracked by the superproject, go through the list
of configured slaves, check yourself out to the branch, get the git
status, then switch back to the branch you were on. The output is
summarized for each branch to merge the lists of files in each section.

The -m option will attempt to "move" any uncommitted changes, which may
prevent failures checking out other branches, at the risk of creating
conflicts, which are then moved as well

Other args supported by `git status` are also supported; these are the
same options supported by `git commit`.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits statuses
  --------------------------------------------------

Make an archive of the repositories gits archive GIT-ARCHIVE-ARGS

This is the standard git archive command--with the addition of a new
--format option of "gits-tar". When you select the gits-tar option, you
must supply an on-disk --output file and you cannot use any tar
compression options. With gits-tar, the output tar archive will be a
unified archive of the entire project, superproject and slaves. Any
existing prefix will be treated as a directory prefix (e.g. --prefix foo
and --prefix foo/ are the same) and all slave repositories will be
unpacked in their corresponding superproject locations.

If you choose a format other than gits-tar, you will probably want to
use one of the substitutions like %%basename%% or %%dir%% in the output
filename.

  --------------------------------------------------
  gits archive --format gits-tar -o /tmp/foo.tar master
  --------------------------------------------------
  gits archive --format tar -o /tmp/foo-%%basename%%.tar master
  --------------------------------------------------

Enable gits on a single git repository gits enable

Sometimes you may wish to use gitslave commands (like gits release) in a
single git repository; you can enable this (without committing the
.gitslave file) using this command. You run this command in the git root
directory. If you later want to manage it as a superproject, you can
still use gits prepare to do so.

  --------------------------------------------------
  git clone ssh://sourcemaster/src/repos/single.git single
  cd single
  gits enable
  --------------------------------------------------

Enable gits on a single git repository gits version [–porcelain]

Print version information for gits, git, and Perl.

With --porcelain, just print gits' revision without any human
decoration.

Everything else All other commands are passed directly though to git, with one command being run per repository. Output summarizing is performed so that multiple repositories with the same git output will only have the git output shown once. git status has a more aggressive summarizing to merge the lists of files in each section.

  Examples:
  --------------------------------------------------
  gits commit -a -m "This is a change"
  gits push
  gits pull
  gits branch testing
  gits checkout testing
  gits diff master testing
  gits status
  gits ....
  --------------------------------------------------

All normal git commands are supported (plus any potential future
commands) but not all commands make sense to run with gits. One good
example is git-daemon.

DESCRIPTION –parallel=COUNT -p COUNT Specify the number of parallel git operations you wish to execute. Parallelism is only activated for push and pull(s) subcommands. This can speed up your processing significantly for large numbers of slave repositories.

If remote repositories are accessed over ssh, you may also wish to
activate ssh "ControlMaster" multiplexing.

  ssh_config
  --------------------------------------------------
  Host git
     ControlMaster auto
     ControlPath ~/.ssh/master-%r@%h:%p
  --------------------------------------------------

However, there currently is a "auto" race condition so the first batch
of peers do not necessarily take advantage of the multiplexing and there
have occasionally been spurious errors with this enabled.

–verbose -v Ask for more information about what is happening. You may repeat the flag multiple times to get more information. One level of verbosity (-v) will print some minor warnings and will specify every repository and its output explicitly. Two levels of verbosity (-vv) will print the underlying commands being executed and three levels (-vvv) will print the data being returned from them.

–quiet Ask for less information, which currently means discarding the STDERR of some of the administrative git commands which are executed.

–rawout Do not go through output summariziation (“On repo” and leading spaces) for most gitslave commands. Note that the output may currently not be in the same repository order as it was originally. Implies –no-hide

Often used for post-processing output. Example:

  rsync -aR `gits --rawout exec sh -c 'git ls-tree -r --name-only HEAD | sed "s:^:%%dir%%/:"'` otherhost:/otherdir

–help Print gits usage summary and details of gits options and substitutions from this documentation, then exit.

–version –versionp –version will print version information for gits, git, and Perl.

--versionp just prints gits' revision without any human decoration.

–paginate –no-pager -n Disable or re-enable default pagination of gits output using a pager. The pager (default is less) and its options are configured just as for git itself (using core.pager in the master repository or global settings, or environment variables PAGER or GIT_PAGER, with the same precedence).

Pagination is only enabled if standard output is a tty (and there is a
controlling tty for the pager to take input from). Pagination is
disabled if the configured pager (from config and environment) is set to
the value "cat" or the empty string.

The -n option will disable pagination, but will be overridden by any
--paginate or --no-pager arguments present on the command line, even if
the -n option is given later.

–eval-args When quoting gits arguments, do not quote dollar ‘$’ and backtick ‘`’ characters, to allow interpolation in the slave environment (but still quote double-quote and backslash). This is mostly useful for exec, where you might want something like the command below to do something useful.

  gits --eval-args exec echo Directory is '`pwd`'

–exclude=SLAVE-REGEXP Provide a regular expression which excludes those slaves from consideration from gits commands which it matches.

–keep-going Do not abort when any subsidiary git command fails - instead print a warning and continue processing. Some git command failures will still be considered fatal and cause gits to abort.

–no-commit This flag requests that gits-internal sub-commands, such as prepare or attach, should not commit their changes after they make them.

–no-hide This flag requests that gits not hide information when similar (but not identical) output such as commit hashes is output for slave repositories.

–no-progress This flag requests that gits NOT print a progress bar, which it does by default for slow operations if Term::ProgressBar is loaded. Slow operations are the checkout, fetch, pull(s), and push subcommands. You may use this flag for all operations.

–no-master This flag requests that gits only run the listed command on the slave repositories and NOT the super/master/top repository.

–with-ifpresent Operate also on those slave repositories which are marked as “ifpresent” even if they are not present. This is mostly useful for gits populate and gits checkout.

–just-ifpresent Operate only on those slave repositories which are marked as “ifpresent” whether they are present or not. This is mostly useful for gits release. Note that this implies –no-master, and overrides –with-ifpresent.

SUBCOMMAND [ARGS]… Run the specified git command (with associated arguments) on the repository and all slave repositories. Typically they are git commands run over each slave, but there are gits specific commands such as: pulls, prepare, attach, populate, resolve, exec, logs, and update-remote-url. See OVERVIEW for more information on specific subcommands.

SUBSTITUTION Before execution, essentially all commands running over all of the repositories will go through a substitution phase where certain magic tokens will be replaced with information about the repository in question. These are most often used with gits exec and gits archive.

%%dir%% represents the on-disk .gitslave-relative of the repository
(e.g. the second field in .gitslave) with the superproject getting the
value of ".".

%%path%% represents the fully qualified path to the repository in
question.

%%basename%% represents the basename of the %%path%%, which is typically
the last component of %%dir%% except for the superproject for which it
is whatever the last directory name of the path to the superproject.

%%upstream%% represents the URL to the origin repository for the
repository in question.

%%upstream_base%% represents the basename to the URL to the origin
repository for the repository in question.

  # Create a shadow set of bare repositories locally w/o massive transfers from origin
  gits exec git clone --bare --reference=%%path%% %%upstream%% /tmp/r/%%upstream_base%%

Also see --eval-args for an option to support standard shell `cmd` and
$VARIABLE expansion where it might otherwise be quoted. Run the
following commmands to see the difference:

  gits exec echo '`ls -ld $PWD`'

  gits --eval-args exec echo '`ls -ld $PWD`'

BUGS gits changes directory to the directory where .gitslave exists. Likewise, when executing most git commands, gits changes directory to the root of the git slave, so any pathnames passed as arguments to gits must be absolute, not relative. Generally this is only a concern for pre-generated commit messages or things like that; you should NOT be passing gits the pathnames of files checked into git slaves–you will likely get the wrong result.

No coding has been performed yet to handle `gits remote set-url` or
`gits branch --set-upstream`. See `gits update-remote-url` for a
supported method to perform this operation. Support could be added if
necessary.

You can have partial success, failure, and repositories on which the
operation was never tried and you must recover from such manually. This
is usually not very complicated. See --keep-going.

Programs like gitk will not show the global system history.

Special care may be needed if one or more of the repositories is a third
party repository and you plan to have a complex branch/tag management
strategy, plan to do (public or private) development on the third party
repository, or might sometimes not want the absolute latest code on the
third party branch. See the gitslave home page for more information on
workarounds.

The behavior when different branches have different slave repositories
associated with them and you checkout back and forth is probably not
ideal (nor are any of the options we have thought of completely ideal).

FILES .gitslave The file containing the list of slave repositories (possibly in relative form) and the directories relative to the master root where they should be checked out.

The format of this file is:

"possibly-relative-repository-path" "top-level-checkout-relative-path"[
flags]

The flags, which are optional, currently can be the value "ifpresent"
which indicates that gits will only process this repository if the
top-level-checkout-relative-path is already present.

ENVIRONMENT GITSLAVE The GITSLAVE environment variable specifies alternate location(s) of the .gitslave file. Note that the .gitslave file must still exist even if it is not used for this particular operation). GITSLAVE can be a filename or a list of filenames separated by comma and space; if a list of filenames is specified, it has the same effect as if the files were concatenated.

An example of a list of filenames, GITSLAVE=".gitslave,
.gitslave-extras" would allow adding a supplemental list of slaves for
unusual activity (e.g. release tagging) to the normal list.

You can also use an alternate .gitslave file with just a subset of the
slave repositories when you don't want to run commands on all of them.

Note that if you are using recursive gitslave superprojects, the
GITSLAVE environment variable overrides .gitslave at the top-level only.
Only if the alternate .gitslave file(s) #include .gitslave (or
alternate) in recursive superprojects will their slave repositories be
included.

REQUIREMENTS perl 5 (probably almost any version of perl 5)

git 1.6 or later (git 1.7 or later preferred)

Optionally uses Parallel::Iterator and Term::ProgressBar if available

AUTHOR Seth Robertson

REPORTING BUGS Report bugs to http://sourceforge.net/projects/gitslave

COPYRIGHT Copyright (c) 2008 Seth Robertson. License is similar to the GNU Lesser General Public License version 2.1, see LICENSE.TXT for more details.

SEE ALSO git(1), git-submodule(1), git-subtree(google)

Gitslave Home Page: <http://gitslave.sf.net>
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